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Digital addictions reach new dimensions in British Columbia

by Greg Klein | September 27, 2018

Maybe this represents a distinctly West Coast weirdness inapplicable to the real world. If not and the trend grows, however, the engagement diamond trade looks doomed, as does procreation. But while waiting for our species to die out, we should be heartened by increased demand for rare earths, tantalum and other necessities of the electronic age.

Digital addictions reach new dimensions in British Columbia

B.C. has long been liberal on issues of sexual preference.

A BC Hydro study found its customers devote an average of 4.7 hours a day, 33 hours a week and 132 hours a month—about a third of their waking time—with the electronic love of their lives, smartphones and tablets. So strong is the passion for smartphones that it can take precedence over human relationships.

“Over a quarter of British Columbians aged 25 to 54 would rather give up seeing their spouse or partner for a day than give up their smartphone or tablet for 24 hours,” the provincial utility reports. “This jumps to one-third for those aged 55 to 64.”

Nor does the preference preclude intimacy. “One-fifth of British Columbians admit to sleeping with their smartphone in bed—and 70% of those aged 18 to 24 at least occasionally sleep with their device.”

Not surprisingly, then, nearly a third of the province between 18 and 24 would give up home heating on a cold winter day rather than their smartphone. Same thing for a day’s pay in the 18-to-34 age bracket.

Maybe most startling of all, “two-thirds of British Columbians would be willing to forgo their morning coffee for two days than their smartphone or tablet for the same time frame.”

Although the BC Hydro report focuses on the implications of electronic devices for electricity consumption, there’s no mention of even greater demand from electric vehicles.

A separate subject, of course, concerns supply of the materials that make up electronic devices. Last year the U.S. Geological Survey broke down the smartphone’s ingredients to demonstrate society’s dependency on wide-ranging and often insecure supply chains. Among them are rare earths from China and tantalum from Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of Congo, both sources of conflict metals. Heightened supply concern has brought an increasing American government focus on critical minerals, while the potential effects of a U.S.-China trade war threaten to exacerbate the situation.

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