Friday 17th November 2017

Resource Clips


March, 2017

Commerce Resources president Chris Grove welcomes Quebec’s participation in his company’s Ashram rare earths project

March 31st, 2017

…Read more

March 31st, 2017

Lithium Q1 2017 review and risks—The train keeps a rollin’ The Disruptive Discoveries Journal
John Mauldin reviews Men Without Work GoldSeek
Lithium suppliers can’t keep up with skyrocketing demand Stockhouse
Fission’s Ross McElroy discusses Patterson Lake South Streetwise Reports
Anarcho Capital’s Jayant Bhandari blasts India SmallCapPower
PDAC 2017: Growing confidence seen in global minerals sector Industrial Minerals
Fed hikes key rate for second time in three months Equities.com
Mining methods: Block caving Geology for Investors
The Donald Trump/Elon Musk alliance Benchmark Mineral Intelligence

Mountain Boy advances B.C. polymetallic, industrial minerals projects

March 30th, 2017

by Greg Klein | March 30, 2017

Among other plans announced March 30, Mountain Boy Minerals TSXV:MTB intends to conduct metallurgical studies for its Surprise Creek joint venture in northwestern British Columbia. Tests will evaluate one interval of drill core reported in February that shows barite, silver, copper and zinc. Barite is mainly used as an ingredient in drilling mud for oil and gas exploration.

Metallurgical results will guide further Surprise Creek exploration, expected to include surface sampling and drilling. Mountain Boy acts as operator on the 7,472-hectare property in a 50/50 JV with Great Bear Resources TSXV:GBR.

Mountain Boy advances B.C. polymetallic, industrial minerals projects

Rugged terrain and high grades
characterize the former Montrose mine.

In southern B.C., Mountain Boy has begun discussions with the Lower Similkameen Indian Band prior to PEA studies on the Manuel Creek zeolite project acquired last December. With numerous agricultural uses for the commodity, this 1,062-hectare project holds the advantage of location in the Okanagan farming region.

Back in the province’s northwest, two companies have surface sampling and drilling planned this year for Red Cliff, held 35% by Mountain Boy and 65% by Decade Resources TSXV:DEC. Amid mountainous terrain, plans call for a drone and climbers to locate a 1988 drill collar to sample the zone and confirm previous results from the former gold-copper mine.

Underground drilling will test above and below the property’s 1,000 mine level, which has previously revealed several high-grade intercepts. Some examples include:

  • 37.26 g/t gold and 6.07% copper over 0.91 metres

  • 21.94 g/t gold and 0.76% copper over 4.42 metres

  • 29.93 g/t gold and 1.57% copper over 1.9 metres.

Additional drilling will help define the property’s Montrose zone. Even higher values have been found here:

  • 5.18 g/t gold and 0.43% copper over 12.65 metres

  • 43.91 g/t gold and 1.46 % copper over 7.47 metres

  • 14.53 g/t gold and 0.27% copper over 30.64 metres

Metallurgical studies will also take place.

From 1939 to 1941, mining at Montrose extracted 65 tons averaging 2.45 ounces per ton gold, 2.95 ounces per ton silver, 0.91% copper, 3.5% lead and 4.41% zinc.

Mountain Boy and Great Bear also share the nearby BA VMS project, from where they reported high-grade polymetallic samples in January.

Along with 80% partner Jayden Resources TSXV:JDN, Mountain Boy holds a 20% interest in another property in B.C.’s Golden Triangle, Silver Coin. Using a 0.3 g/t gold cutoff, the project’s 2011 resource shows a measured and indicated total of 842,416 ounces gold, 4.46 million ounces silver and 91.17 million pounds zinc. The inferred category comes to 813,273 ounces gold, 6.69 million ounces silver and 128 million pounds zinc.

Mountain Boy’s regional portfolio also includes the MB project, with historic, non-43-101 estimates for copper, lead, zinc, silver and barite. Grab samples from last year assayed as high as 31,192 g/t silver. The company additionally holds a 50% stake in the George property, which has historic, non-43-101 estimates for copper, silver and gold.

In mid-March the company closed a private placement totalling $231,619.

March 30th, 2017

John Mauldin reviews Men Without Work GoldSeek
Lithium suppliers can’t keep up with skyrocketing demand Stockhouse
Fission’s Ross McElroy discusses Patterson Lake South Streetwise Reports
Anarcho Capital’s Jayant Bhandari blasts India SmallCapPower
PDAC 2017: Growing confidence seen in global minerals sector Industrial Minerals
Fed hikes key rate for second time in three months Equities.com
Mining methods: Block caving Geology for Investors
The Donald Trump/Elon Musk alliance Benchmark Mineral Intelligence
Lithium and the great reflation The Disruptive Discoveries Journal

The Rio deal

March 29th, 2017

Cashed-up Pistol Bay Mining consolidates and updates Confederation Lake

by Greg Klein

From a Rio Tinto NYSE:RIO subsidiary comes money for an unprecedented campaign in Ontario’s Confederation Lake greenstone belt. That’s where Pistol Bay Mining TSXV:PST has region-wide exploration with modern methods about to begin on a VMS-rich area that’s previously seen piecemeal, unco-ordinated work with old school technology. President/CEO Charles Desjardins sees plenty of promise in his portfolio’s historic resources. But he also likes the blue sky possibility of a new discovery.

Funding the campaign will be $750,000 from Rio, along with this month’s private placement of $548,436. Proceeds go to the largest land package in Confederation Lake, a region of base metals deposits that Desjardins considers to be clamouring for up-to-date exploration.

Cashed-up Pistol Bay Mining consolidates and updates Confederation Lake

Deep penetration brings blue sky potential to Pistol Bay’s
Confederation Lake portfolio. (Photo: Geotech Ltd)

Rio’s portion comes as the giant exercises more of its 100% option on the junior’s C4, C5 and C6 uranium properties in Saskatchewan’s Athabasca Basin. The deal originally called for $5 million by the end of 2019 and a 5% net profit interest to acquire the final 25%. Now Rio pays the $750,000 along with either $1.5 million by 2017 year-end, $2 million by 2018 year-end or $2.25 million by 2019 year-end, plus the 5% NPI.

“That’s less money than the original option, but I can create so much value with it now,” says Desjardins. “And I’m doing it without dilution.”

First item on the agenda—and long overdue, Desjardins believes—will be helicopter-borne VTEM Max, penetrating to depths of 500 to 700 metres. “There have been major Canadian discoveries over the last decade with this kind of geophysics,” he points out. “But very little of this belt, less than 5% of it, has been explored beyond 200 metres. There’s only one zone examined to 300 metres and that was with downhole geophysics by Noranda.”

He expects the first of three airborne campaigns to begin within four weeks. While Pistol Bay’s package comprises 9,450 hectares, “we’re going to fly this whole belt,” he adds. “I’m looking for something bigger, something that hasn’t been found.”

As for the deposits that have been found, they’re overdue for upgrading to 43-101 status. First priority is the polymetallic Arrow deposit, which has a 2007 estimate that Pistol Bay considers historic and non-43-101:

3% zinc-equivalent cutoff

  • indicated: 2.07 million tonnes averaging 5.92% zinc, 0.75% copper, 21.1 g/t silver and 0.58 g/t gold

  • inferred: 120,552 tonnes averaging 2.6% zinc, 0.56% copper, 18.6 g/t silver and 0.4 g/t gold

5% zinc-equivalent cutoff

  • indicated: 1.76 million tonnes averaging 6.75% zinc, 0.79% copper, 22.3 g/t silver and 0.61 g/t gold

  • inferred: 51,631 tonnes averaging 3.86% zinc, 0.79% copper, 23.9 g/t silver and 0.58 g/t gold

10% zinc-equivalent cutoff

  • indicated: 633,000 tonnes averaging 14.3% zinc, 1.11% copper, 31.7 g/t silver and 0.85 g/t gold

Desjardins expects about a month to redo the resource, incorporating another 20 holes.

About eight kilometres west of Arrow, the Fredart zone, also known as Copperlode A, has an historic, non-43-101 estimate showing 385,000 tonnes averaging 1.56% copper and 33.6 g/t silver.

Roughly 24 kilometres farther west, the Dixie property’s historic, non-43-101 estimate comes to 136,000 tonnes averaging 14% zinc.

Estimates for other zones, all with historic, non-43-101 caveats, include:

  • Dixie 3: 83,000 tonnes averaging 10% zinc and 1% copper

  • Diamond Willow: 270,000 tonnes averaging 4% zinc

There have been major Canadian discoveries over the last decade with this kind of geophysics. But very little of this belt, less than 5% of it, has been explored beyond 200 metres.—Charles Desjardins, president/CEO of Pistol Bay Mining

Past work has left an extensive legacy of other data too. Historic records for the recently optioned Joy North property show intriguing electromagnetic and geochemical anomalies. Pistol Bay’s team has been poring over details of about 850 Confederation Lake holes sunk between 1962 and 2007. A Noranda database of rock chemical analysis, meanwhile, could offer insight into the belt’s VMS mineralizing process and help define zinc-copper targets.

Along with February’s Joy North option, Pistol Bay’s acquisitions continue with the Lucky 7 and Moth properties picked up this month. Now yellow metal shows its Confederation Lake potential with one 2016 grab sample assaying 13.84 g/t gold and 3.21% copper.

As for drilling, the already-permitted Joy North might be first, depending on the review of historic info. Eight other areas have permitting underway. The rigs will take part in Pistol Bay’s threefold near-term agenda: the Arrow resource, the VTEM Max and a drill program, all of which should fuel a steady news flow. “We’ve got lots of work coming up and, thanks to the Rio payment, money to do it with no dilution,” says Desjardins.

Apart from growing the existing deposits, he clearly believes in the potential for a new discovery. “The opportunity here is in consolidating the belt and exploring the whole thing at depth, which hasn’t been done. There’s lots of blue sky at Confederation Lake.”

March 29th, 2017

John Mauldin reviews Men Without Work GoldSeek
Lithium suppliers can’t keep up with skyrocketing demand Stockhouse
Fission’s Ross McElroy discusses Patterson Lake South Streetwise Reports
Anarcho Capital’s Jayant Bhandari blasts India SmallCapPower
PDAC 2017: Growing confidence seen in global minerals sector Industrial Minerals
Fed hikes key rate for second time in three months Equities.com
Mining methods: Block caving Geology for Investors
The Donald Trump/Elon Musk alliance Benchmark Mineral Intelligence
Lithium and the great reflation The Disruptive Discoveries Journal

92 Resources begins metallurgical tests on NWT lithium

March 28th, 2017

by Greg Klein | March 28, 2017

A Northwest Territories lithium project gets its first-ever metallurgical studies as 92 Resources TSXV:NTY announced a two-phase program on March 28. The 1,659-hectare Hidden Lake property underwent channel sampling last year on four of six known lithium-bearing spodumene dykes, with the best intercept showing:

  • 1.58% Li2O and 31 ppm Ta2O5 over 8.78 metres

  • (including 1.78% Li2O and 31 ppm Ta2O5 over 6.93 metres)
92 Resources begins metallurgical tests on NWT lithium

Hidden Lake’s metallurgical tests follow
last year’s successful sampling program.

The met program’s first phase examines the property’s spodumene and waste materials, leading to a mineral processing phase intended to separate the two and produce a high-grade concentrate.

Material from four pegmatites will be evaluated separately and, if no significant differences are found, a single composite will undergo processing tests. Those tests would include grinding, heavy liquid separation, magnetic separation and flotation. Plans then call for a preliminary flowsheet and a small amount of potentially marketable spodumene concentrate.

The program will also evaluate potential tantalum recovery.

Hidden Lake has all-weather road access to Yellowknife, 45 kilometres southwest. Carrying out the tests will be SGS Canada, which has considerable experience in spodumene pegmatite processing, 92 Resources stated.

In northern Quebec, 92 Resources has initial lithium exploration planned for Pontax, a 5,536-hectare property in a district known for spodumene-bearing pegmatites as well as gold potential.

Earlier this month the company expanded its Golden frac sand project from 807 hectares to 3,211 hectares. The southeastern British Columbia property sits adjacent to the Moberly silica sand project, now being redeveloped into a frac sand operation and among the assets sought by Northern Silica in its takeover bid for Heemskirk Consolidated.

Late last month 92 Resources closed an oversubscribed private placement of $895,199.

March 28th, 2017

John Mauldin reviews Men Without Work GoldSeek
Lithium suppliers can’t keep up with skyrocketing demand Stockhouse
Fission’s Ross McElroy discusses Patterson Lake South Streetwise Reports
Anarcho Capital’s Jayant Bhandari blasts India SmallCapPower
PDAC 2017: Growing confidence seen in global minerals sector Industrial Minerals
Fed hikes key rate for second time in three months Equities.com
Mining methods: Block caving Geology for Investors
The Donald Trump/Elon Musk alliance Benchmark Mineral Intelligence
Lithium and the great reflation The Disruptive Discoveries Journal

Seen this 100-kilo gold coin? Call Berlin police

March 27th, 2017

by Greg Klein | March 27, 2017, updated March 28, 2017

A 100-kilogram Maple Leaf gold coin seems destined for meltdown following a daring heist at Berlin’s Bode Museum. With a face value of $1 million but worth over four times that amount at today’s prices, it’s one of five identical coins produced by the Royal Canadian Mint.

Thieves entered the building between 2:00 and 4:00 a.m. March 27, according to a museum statement.

Seen this 100-kilo gold coin? Call Berlin police

A tad too conspicuous for general circulation, an identical
coin delights visitors at Toronto’s Royal Ontario Museum.
(Photo: Royal Ontario Museum)

“We are shocked that the burglars overcame our security systems, which have been successfully protecting our objects for many years,” said Michael Eissenhauer, director general for the State Museums of Berlin. “We hope that the perpetrators will be caught and the precious coin will be returned undamaged.”

The museum requested tips from anyone who’s been offered deals on large volumes of gold.

Due to superior security or less brazen bandits, other million-dollar Maple Leafs have survived Canadian museums. Victoria’s Royal B.C. Museum hosted the numismatic oddity in 2015 at the Gold Rush! El Dorado in British Columbia exhibit, before the show’s artefacts went to Gatineau’s Canadian Museum of History last spring.

That Maple Leaf belongs to its creator, the Royal Canadian Mint. “We don’t know who owns the coin stolen in Berlin but we can confirm that it’s not the Mint’s,” Alex Reeves of RCM external communications informed ResourceClips.com. “Our own coin is safe and sound in our Ottawa vaults.” The Mint doesn’t reveal the other owners’ names, Reeves added.

Making no secret of its ownership, Barrick Gold TSX:ABX displays its Maple Leaf in the company’s section of the Teck Suite of Galleries at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto. A ROM spokesperson declined to discuss security arrangements.

The Ottawa mint has itself been victim of a heist, although not a caper likely to inspire admiration. Last month former employee Leston Lawrence was sentenced to 30 months and ordered to repay $190,000 or serve an additional 30 months. The court heard he snuck something like 22 gold “pucks,” weighing around 7.4 ounces each, out of his workplace and into the hands of buyers.

Among the evidence was a tube of Vaseline found in his locker. He smuggled the contraband in his rectum.

Far Resources readies Phase II drilling at Manitoba lithium project

March 27th, 2017

by Greg Klein | March 27, 2017

Far Resources readies Phase II drilling at Manitoba lithium project

A Dyke #1 outcrop shows
spodumene-bearing pegmatite.

Scheduled to begin imminently, a second drill program will focus on Dyke #1 at Far Resources’ (CSE:FAT) Zoro lithium property in Manitoba’s Snow Lake region. Targets have been identified as the company refines its 3D model, incorporating previous drilling data and historic field work.

The historic work found support in last year’s Phase I, in which all seven holes revealed lithium-bearing pegmatite, with intercepts grading up to 1.13% Li2O over 12.1 metres and 1.1% over 23.4 metres.

Zoro can be accessed via highway and helicopter, or by boat, road and ATV. The property sits five kilometres from transmission lines and 30 kilometres from rail.

In New Mexico, Far Resources has due diligence underway on the Winston silver-gold project, home to past-producing mines. Should the deal be consummated, a summer program of six to eight holes would follow.

Having closed an oversubscribed private placement of $231,000 in November, the company now plans to issue one million shares at $0.10 to compensate some of Zoro’s Phase II contractors.