Friday 17th November 2017

Resource Clips


February, 2017

Rockcliff Copper stakes new ground next to historic Manitoba zinc deposit

February 28th, 2017

by Greg Klein | February 28, 2017

Still adding to its approximately 45,000-hectare property package in Manitoba’s Flin Flon-Snow Lake mining camp, Rockcliff Copper TSXV:RCU acquired the Penex zinc project by staking. Located less than 200 metres from the historic Pen deposit, the property already has a deep-penetrating EM survey underway prior to drilling planned for this year.

Rockcliff Copper stakes new ground next to historic Manitoba zinc deposit

All of the historic deposit’s lenses dip towards the new acquisition’s northern boundary, with at least one zinc-bearing lens dipping onto the property, the company stated. An historic, non-43-101 drill hole on Penex assayed 4.04% zinc-equivalent over 7.57 metres, including 6.73% over 2.64 metres.

Bore hole geophysics confirmed that conductivity continued downward within the property, strengthening at depth in an area untested by drilling, Rockcliff added.

The new turf “underpins our commitment to acquire properties either by staking or acquisition that have significant metal potential within trucking distance to milling facilities in this world class base and precious metals camp,” said president/CEO Ken Lapierre.

Rockcliff has work planned this year on four of the other properties that comprise its Snow Lake project. Two weeks ago the company reported assays from its 51%-held Talbot copper-polymetallic VMS property, where Phase II drilling continues. A resource calculated last year for three Talbot zones brought an average copper-equivalent grade of 5.5%. The inferred category totalled:

  • 2.17 million tonnes averaging 2.8% copper, 2.4 g/t gold, 2.2% zinc and 54.6 g/t silver for 133.6 million pounds copper, 165,400 ounces gold, 107.4 million pounds zinc and 3.81 million ounces silver

Rockcliff’s 2017 agenda also calls for work on its Bur zinc project, the Rail copper-gold-silver property and the former Laguna gold mine. Debt-free, the company currently has about $1.5 million on hand.

In another February 28 announcement, the Fraser Institute rated Manitoba second to Saskatchewan worldwide in the 2016 survey of 104 mining jurisdictions. “Competitive tax regimes, efficient permitting procedures and certainty surrounding environmental regulations and land claims have vaulted Saskatchewan and Manitoba to the top in the eyes of miners looking to invest,” said Kenneth Green, a co-author of the study.

Read more about Rockcliff Copper.

King’s Bay flies geophysics over Labrador copper-cobalt project

February 28th, 2017

by Greg Klein | February 28, 2017

Following a 12-fold expansion of the property last month, King’s Bay Gold TSXV:KBG announced a VTEM survey now airborne on the Lynx Lake copper-cobalt project in southeastern Labrador. Survey operator Geotech Ltd says its proprietary system reaches more than 800 metres in depth, featuring high spatial resolution as well as a low base frequency to pass through conductive overburden. “This system is advertised to be able to delineate potential drill hole targets from the airborne results,” King’s Bay stated. The survey’s expected to wrap up by mid-April.

King’s Bay flies geophysics over Labrador copper-cobalt project

Field work revealed gossan and
massive sulphides at Lynx Lake.

Lynx Lake’s potential came to light after the Trans-Labrador Highway opened up the region in 2008. Grab samples from the 24,000-hectare property’s east side showed non-43-101 results up to 1.39% copper, 0.94% cobalt, 0.21% nickel and 6.5 g/t silver. On the west side, non-43-101 grab samples assayed up to 1.03% copper, 0.566% cobalt, 0.1% nickel, 5 g/t silver, 0.36% chromium, 0.39% molybdenum and 0.23% vanadium.

A regional low-res magnetic survey conducted by the province and a hand-held EM device brought preliminary indications of strong conductors in the area. A 90-minute drive from the town of Happy Valley-Goose Bay, Lynx Lake has powerlines and a highway adjacent to the property.

Two weeks earlier King’s Bay announced a 100% option on the Trump Island property in Newfoundland, where a shipment of high-grade copper-cobalt material was reportedly mined in 1863. In early February the company picked up three Quebec properties, all of which had historic, non-43-101 sampling results showing cobalt.

King’s Bay closed a $938,752 private placement in January.

See an infographic: Cobalt—A precarious supply chain.

February 28th, 2017

GATA chairperson Bill Murphy’s presentation to the Dollar Vigilante conference GoldSeek
Questions every investor should ask at PDAC 2017 SmallCapPower
Magnesia next in line for China’s anti-pollution crackdown? Industrial Minerals
Cobalt: Commodity overview Geology for Investors
The cobalt window finally opens up The Disruptive Discoveries Journal
Who’s the greatest stock picker of all time? Equities.com
Want to find the opportunities? Follow the sentiment Stockhouse
How to profit from Trumponomics Streetwise Reports
A year in review: 2016 Benchmark Mineral Intelligence

February 27th, 2017

GATA chairperson Bill Murphy’s presentation to the Dollar Vigilante conference GoldSeek
Questions every investor should ask at PDAC 2017 SmallCapPower
Magnesia next in line for China’s anti-pollution crackdown? Industrial Minerals
Cobalt: Commodity overview Geology for Investors
The cobalt window finally opens up The Disruptive Discoveries Journal
Who’s the greatest stock picker of all time? Equities.com
Want to find the opportunities? Follow the sentiment Stockhouse
How to profit from Trumponomics Streetwise Reports
A year in review: 2016 Benchmark Mineral Intelligence

Golden Dawn Minerals releases silver-gold-polymetallic assays from historic Greenwood camp

February 24th, 2017

by Greg Klein | February 24, 2017

Underground drilling delivered the highest silver and gold assays so far from the Skomac vein system at the former May Mac mine, Golden Dawn Minerals TSXV:GOM reported February 23. With noteworthy lead and zinc numbers as well, the results come from one of the past-producers the company intends to revive at its Greenwood portfolio in southern British Columbia. The assays reflect nine of this year’s 10 May Mac holes totalling 1,320 metres, while results are pending for the tenth hole. Along with nine holes sunk late last year and released in mid-January, the work currently totals 2,125 metres.

All 19 holes hit the Skomac vein system, showing mineralization continues along the principal vein from the #6 level, passing the #7 level. Parallel veins also revealed mineralization. Some highlights include:

Hole MU17-01

  • 235 g/t silver, 2.07 g/t gold, 0.8% lead, 1.4% zinc and 0.2% copper over 1.56 metres, starting at 32.05 metres in downhole depth

MU17-02

  • 231.2 g/t silver, 0.51 g/t gold, 5.9% lead, 6.4% zinc and 0.3% copper over 1.92 metres, starting at 59.44 metres
Golden Dawn Minerals releases silver-gold-polymetallic assays from historic Greenwood camp

Golden Dawn plans additional underground
drilling and a bulk sample at the former May Mac mine.

MU17-05

  • 177 g/t silver, 7.91 g/t gold, 0.5% lead, 0.4% zinc and 0.1% copper over 1.05 metres, starting at 32.67 metres

MU17-06

  • 35.1 g/t silver, 6.32 g/t gold, 0.3% lead, 0.6% zinc and 0.1% copper over 1.36 metres, starting at 224.82 metres
  • (including 79.5 g/t silver, 14.55 g/t gold, 0.6% lead, 0.3% zinc and 0.1% copper over 0.46 metres)

MU17-07

  • 371 g/t silver, 8.86 g/t gold, 0.7% lead and 0.2% copper over 0.5 metres, starting at 62.7 metres

MU17-08

  • 559.4 g/t silver, 1.27 g/t gold, 0.2% lead, 2.1% zinc and 0.1% copper over 2.06 metres, starting at 52.8 metres
  • (including 1,935 g/t silver, 4.21 g/t gold, 0.7% lead, 7.1% zinc and 0.2% copper over 0.54 metres)

True widths weren’t available.

With more holes scheduled for this drill station, Golden Dawn plans additional underground work at two other drill stations. The company also has permitting underway to extend the #7 drift for drilling and bulk sampling up to 10,000 tonnes. Processing would take place at Golden Dawn’s Greenwood mill, 15 kilometres southeast.

Looking at another of the company’s Greenwood properties, Golden Dawn has applied for a surface drilling permit for its Golden Crown property, which has a 2016 resource estimating 62,500 gold-equivalent ounces indicated and 13,100 ounces inferred.

Other plans include field work on an acquisition of 29 former Greenwood mines that closed last week.

On February 24 the company announced closing of a US$1-million convertible security increase with Lind Asset Management VI. Earlier this month Golden Dawn reported receiving an initial US$3 million of a US$4-million streaming deal from RIVI Capital.

With an extensive portfolio of former mines proximal to its 200-tpd mill, Golden Dawn hopes to revive the historic Greenwood camp, about six hours’ drive east of Vancouver.

February 24th, 2017

Questions every investor should ask at PDAC 2017 SmallCapPower
Magnesia next in line for China’s anti-pollution crackdown? Industrial Minerals
Project Veritas sets its sights on “very fake news” CNN as the alt media strikes back GoldSeek
Cobalt: Commodity overview Geology for Investors
The cobalt window finally opens up The Disruptive Discoveries Journal
Who’s the greatest stock picker of all time? Equities.com
Want to find the opportunities? Follow the sentiment Stockhouse
How to profit from Trumponomics Streetwise Reports
A year in review: 2016 Benchmark Mineral Intelligence

February 24th, 2017

Questions every investor should ask at PDAC 2017 SmallCapPower
Magnesia next in line for China’s anti-pollution crackdown? Industrial Minerals
Project Veritas sets its sights on “very fake news” CNN as the alt media strikes back GoldSeek
Cobalt: Commodity overview Geology for Investors
The cobalt window finally opens up The Disruptive Discoveries Journal
Who’s the greatest stock picker of all time? Equities.com
Want to find the opportunities? Follow the sentiment Stockhouse
How to profit from Trumponomics Streetwise Reports
A year in review: 2016 Benchmark Mineral Intelligence

Battery infographic series Part 5: The future of battery technology

February 23rd, 2017

by Jeff Desjardins | posted with permission of Visual Capitalist | February 23, 2017

The Battery Series presents five infographics exploring what investors need to know about modern battery technology, including raw material supply, demand and future applications.

The future of battery technology

This is the last instalment of the Battery Series. For a recap of what has been covered so far, see the evolution of battery technology, the energy problem in context, the reasons behind the surge in lithium-ion demand and the critical materials needed to make lithium-ion batteries.

There’s no doubt that the lithium-ion battery has been an important catalyst for the green revolution, but there is still much work to be done for a full switch to renewable energy.

The battery technology of the future could:

  • Make electric cars a no-brainer choice for any driver

  • Make grid-scale energy storage solutions cheap and efficient

  • Make a full switch to renewable energy more feasible

Right now, scientists see many upcoming battery innovations that promise to do this. However, the road to commercialization is long, arduous and filled with many unexpected obstacles.

The near-term: Improving the Li-ion

For the foreseeable future, the improvement of battery technology relies on modifications being made to already-existing lithium-ion technology. In fact, experts estimate that lithium-ions will continue to increase capacity by 6% to 7% annually for a number of years.

Here’s what’s driving those advances:

Efficient manufacturing

Tesla has already made significant advances in battery design and production through its Gigafactory:

  • Better engineering and manufacturing processes

  • Wider and longer cell design allows more materials packaged into each cell

  • New battery cooling system fits more cells into battery pack

Better cathodes

Most of the recent advances in lithium-ion energy density have come from manipulating the relative quantities of cobalt, aluminum, manganese and nickel in the cathodes. By 2020, 75% of batteries are expected to contain cobalt in some capacity.

For scientists, it’s about finding the materials and crystal structures that can store the maximum amount of ions. The next generation of cathodes may be born from lithium-rich layered oxide materials (LLOs) or similar approaches, such as the nickel-rich variety.

Better anodes

While most lithium-ion progress to date has come from cathode tinkering, the biggest advances might happen in the anode.

Current graphite anodes can only store one lithium atom for every six carbon atoms—but silicon anodes could store 4.4 lithium atoms for every one silicon atom. That’s a theoretical tenfold increase in capacity!

However, the problem with this is well documented. When silicon houses these lithium-ions, it ends up bloating in size up to 400%. This volume change can cause irreversible damage to the anode, making the battery unusable.

To get around this, scientists are looking at a few different solutions.

1. Encasing silicon in a graphene “cage” to prevent cracking after expansion.

2. Using silicon nanowires, which can better handle the volume change.

3. Adding silicon in tiny amounts using existing manufacturing processes—Tesla is rumoured to be doing this already.

Solid-state lithium-ion

Lastly, a final improvement that is being worked on for the lithium-ion battery is to use a solid-state setup, rather than having liquid electrolytes enabling the ion transfer. This design could increase energy density in the future, but it still has some problems to resolve first, such as ions moving too slowly through the solid electrolyte.

The long term: Beyond the lithium-ion

Here are some new innovations in the pipeline that could help enable the future of battery technology:

Lithium-air

Anode: Lithium

Cathode: Porous carbon (oxygen)

Promise: 10 times greater energy density than Li-ion

Problems: Air is not pure enough and would need to be filtered. Lithium and oxygen form peroxide films that produce a barrier, ultimately killing storage capacity. Cycle life is only 50 cycles in lab tests

Variations: Scientists also trying aluminum-air and sodium-air batteries

Lithium-sulphur

Anode: Lithium

Cathode: Sulphur, carbon

Promise: Lighter, cheaper and more powerful than Li-ion

Problems: Volume expansion up to 80%, causing mechanical stress. Unwanted reactions with electrolytes. Poor conductivity and poor stability at higher temperatures

Variations: Many different variations exist, including using graphite/graphene, and silicon in the chemistry

Vanadium flow batteries

Catholyte: Vanadium

Anolyte: Vanadium

Promise: Using vanadium ions in different oxidation states to store chemical potential energy at scale. Can be expanded simply by using larger electrolyte tanks

Problems: Poor energy-to-volume ratio. Very heavy, must be used in stationary applications

Variations: Scientists are experimenting with other flow battery chemistries as well, such as zinc-bromine

Battery series conclusion

While the future of battery technology is very exciting, for the near and medium terms scientists are mainly focused on improving the already-commercialized lithium-ion.

What does the battery market look like 15 to 20 years from now? It’s ultimately hard to say. However, it’s likely that some of the above new technologies will help in leading the charge to a 100% renewable future.

Thanks for taking a look at the Battery Series.

See Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 and Part 4.

Posted with permission of Visual Capitalist.

Infographics: Think again about natural resources

February 23rd, 2017

Among the news from Resource Works is the #ThinkAgain campaign, a series of infographics that “set the record straight on myths, misunderstandings, ‘alternative facts’ and fake news about resources.”

Here’s the current batch. Resource Works promises more to come.

Infographics: Think again about natural resources

Infographics: Think again about natural resources

Infographics: Think again about natural resources

Infographics: Think again about natural resources

Infographics: Think again about natural resources

Infographics: Think again about natural resources

Infographics: Think again about natural resources

Infographics: Think again about natural resources

Infographics: Think again about natural resources

Infographics: Think again about natural resources

Infographics: Think again about natural resources

Infographics: Think again about natural resources

Infographics: Think again about natural resources

Posted with permission of Resource Works, a non-profit research and advocacy organization “supporting a respectful, fact-based public dialogue on responsible resource development in B.C.”

February 23rd, 2017

Project Veritas sets its sights on “very fake news” CNN as the alt media strikes back GoldSeek
Cobalt: Commodity overview Geology for Investors
The cobalt window finally opens up The Disruptive Discoveries Journal
A turning point for rare earths? Industrial Minerals
Who’s the greatest stock picker of all time? Equities.com
Want to find the opportunities? Follow the sentiment Stockhouse
How to profit from Trumponomics Streetwise Reports
Jonathan Goodman: Resource bull market has a long way to go SmallCapPower
A year in review: 2016 Benchmark Mineral Intelligence