Friday 30th September 2016

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NexGen Energy’s latest discovery emphasizes PLS camp’s regional potential

by Greg Klein | August 11, 2016

Described as “strong visible uranium mineralization” with “dense accumulations of massive to semi-massive pitchblende,” the Harpoon discovery adds another weapon to NexGen Energy’s (TSX:NXE) arsenal. Announced August 11, hole HP-16-08 features 17 metres of continuous mineralization, 4.5 metres of it “off-scale” or above the 9,999-counts-per-second limit of older scintillometers. At least one point surpassed 61,000 cps. To put that in perspective, 500 cps rates as anomalous. Impressive as they are, results like that keep in line with the Rook 1 project’s Arrow resource, the Athabasca Basin’s largest undeveloped deposit. But this hole’s located 4.7 kilometres northeast.

NexGen Energy’s latest discovery emphasizes PLS camp’s regional potential

A regional discovery 4.7 kilometres northeast of NexGen’s
Arrow deposit delivered a boxful of pitchblende treasures.

Once again demonstrating the Patterson Lake South region’s overall potential, NexGen collared HP-16-08 as a 250-metre stepout from HP-16-06, which scintillated another 1.5 metres of continuous mineralization. The company now traces 5.6 kilometres in northeasterly mineralized strike between Arrow and Harpoon. Another 300 metres northeast of Harpoon lies the Spitfire discovery of JV partners Purepoint Uranium TSXV:PTU, Cameco Corp TSX:CCO and AREVA Resources Canada.

Results for NexGen’s latest four holes, all land-based, show:

HP-16-05

  • <500 to 890 cps over 1.5 metres, starting at 292 metres in downhole depth

HP-16-06

  • <500 to 2,200 cps over 1.5 metres, starting at 303 metres

HP-16-08

  • <500 to >61,000 cps over 17 metres, starting at 220 metres

HP-16-07 returned nothing of significance. True widths weren’t available.

Calling HP-16-08 “an extremely exciting development,” CEO Leigh Curyer credited VP of exploration Garrett Ainsworth and his team for the success. The discovery has “severely elevated the prospectivity of some of the other targets we’ve got along the Patterson [conductive] corridor, and we want to be able to test those as well,” Curyer told a conference call. The seven-rig, 35,000-metre summer campaign has focused on both infill and expansion at Arrow, with about 25% of the program on regional targets. Harpoon has prompted the company to consider adding an eighth rig.

The geophysics done on [the Derkson conductive corridor] show that’s got multiple targets as well, which are identical to what we’re seeing at Arrow and what we’re learning about at Harpoon as well…. We could be there for many, many years with seven drill rigs before we truly understand the magnitude of what we’re dealing with.—Leigh Curyer,
CEO of NexGen Energy

Curyer noted the proximity of Fission Uranium’s (TSX:FCU) Patterson Lake South to the southwest, as well as Spitfire to the northeast.

Home to all the PLS discoveries so far, the Patterson corridor remains “very under-drilled and we’ve got a lot of drilling to do … until we ultimately understand the scale of the deposition,” Curyer emphasized. Rook 1 is “obviously massive and there’s not a property like it that I’m aware of on the planet.”

But he pointed out that Rook 1 hosts seven known corridors. Parallel east to Patterson is the Derkson corridor, “and the geophysics done on that show that’s got multiple targets as well, which are identical to what we’re seeing at Arrow and what we’re learning about at Harpoon as well…. We could be there for many, many years with seven drill rigs before we truly understand the magnitude of what we’re dealing with. But suffice to say at the minimum—it’s huge.”

If the company misses its H2 target for the Arrow resource update, the team will attribute that to continued drilling success, he added. A postponement to early 2017 might be necessary “to do justice” to the deposit.

NexGen’s bankroll currently holds about $91 million.

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