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Dunnedin Ventures meets community, updates exploration permit application

by Greg Klein | April 20, 2016

Following two days of meetings with community and government reps, Dunnedin Ventures TSXV:DVI will submit an updated exploration permit application, the company announced April 20. Earlier this month the Nunavut Impact Review Board recommended Dunnedin modify or scrap its Kahuna diamond project. A decision rests with Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada.

Dunnedin Ventures meets community, updates exploration permit application

The project sits about 42 kilometres from the hamlet of Rankin Inlet on Hudson Bay’s northwestern shore. Meetings were held there and at Chesterfield Inlet, about 100 kilometres away.

The company has stated its current exploration permit remains valid until mid-2017. In December, however, Dunnedin applied for an extension. The NIRB responded negatively after hearing criticism from the Kivalliq Inuit Association and the Aqigiq Hunters and Trappers Organization about a lack of community consultation.

Following the meetings, Dunnedin CEO Chris Taylor pledged ongoing community engagement. He also stated the company would update its Wildlife and Environment Monitoring and Mitigation Plan with traditional knowledge, and undertake archeological surveys over proposed work areas.

The NIRB also heard concerns about Josephine Lake, an abandoned exploration site not connected with Dunnedin or its project. The company promised not to explore the lake and to avoid traditional hunting and fishing areas along the Josephine River. Dunnedin also said it would support a KIA clean-up operation at the abandoned site. “While not on Dunnedin’s claims, the camp should be remediated to the benefit of all local stakeholders including Dunnedin,” the company stated.

We look forward to providing economic opportunities and benefits to members of both communities in a way that supplements and is compatible with traditional ways of life.—Chris Taylor,
CEO of Dunnedin Ventures

Incorporating all of the NIRB’s recommendations, Dunnedin expects to submit an updated permit application to the feds next week.

“We at Dunnedin will do our best to be respectful guests as we explore for diamonds,” Taylor said. “We look forward to providing economic opportunities and benefits to members of both communities in a way that supplements and is compatible with traditional ways of life.”

In November Dunnedin reported 96 commercial-sized stones from a 0.82-tonne sample. Last month, with processing of a 2.4-tonne sample about 40% complete, the company recovered 36 commercial-sized diamonds. To guide further exploration, Dunnedin planned to have till samples analysed before processing the rest of the bulk sample.

Using a 0.85-millimetre cutoff, a 2015 inferred resource for two kimberlite dykes totalled 3.99 million tonnes averaging 1.01 carat per tonne for 4.02 million carats.

Read more about Dunnedin Ventures.

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