Wednesday 13th December 2017

Resource Clips


May, 2015

Quebec rare earths: Commerce hits 2.08% TREO over 17.5 metres, including 4.57% over 1.46 metres

May 29th, 2015

by Greg Klein | May 29, 2015

With initial results from the Ashram rare earths deposit’s winter/spring drill program released May 29, Commerce Resources TSXV:CCE reported delineation success in all of the first eight holes. The octet targeted Ashram’s eastern margins, part of a goal to upgrade current inferred resources to the indicated or measured categories as the northern Quebec project moves towards pre-feasibility.

Some highlights include:

Hole EC15-112

  • 1.73% total rare earth oxides over 92.77 metres, starting at 57.65 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 2.04% over 25.23 metres)
Quebec rare earths: Commerce hits 2.08% TREO over 17.5 metres, including 4.57% over 1.46 metres

With 23 more holes to report from the last drill campaign, Commerce has also been making progress with
metallurgical tests and infrastructure planning.

Hole EC15-114

  • 2.08% TREO over 17.5 metres, starting at 110.07 metres
  • (including 4.57% over 1.46 metres)

Hole EC15-116

  • 1.77% TREO over 151.19 metres, starting at 3.05 metres
  • (including 2.12% over 34.53 metres)

Hole EC15-117

  • 1.82% TREO over 110.2 metres, starting at 102.25 metres
  • (including 2.03% over 60.83 metres)

True thicknesses were estimated between 50% and 70% of downhole intervals along the deposit’s eastern margins. “However, the cone-like nature of the deposit effectively increases the true thickness to 100% as intersections move inwards, towards the deposit’s centre,” Commerce stated.

Hole EC15-114 also showed significant middle and heavy rare earth oxide mineralization:

  • 11.5% MHREO over 1.32 metres, starting at 46 metres

  • 13.5% MHREO over 1.4 metres, starting at 69.49 metres

Commerce stated it’s “not clear if this is an extension of the main zone of MHREO or an isolated pod of MHREO mineralization within the larger Ashram deposit.”

All eight holes ended at a pre-determined depth for pre-feas purposes. Six holes bottomed in strong mineralization, with EC15-114’s 4.57% TREO over 1.46 metres ranking as the project’s 10th-highest assay ever and stopping at a relatively shallow depth of 117 metres. Ashram’s best-ever assay is 9.88% TREO over 0.39 metres at 525 metres in depth.

Ashram’s rare earth elements occur primarily in monazite and to a lesser extent bastnaesite and xenotime, minerals that dominate the currently known commercial extraction processes, the company added. Still to come are assays for 23 more holes of the 31-hole, 4,146-metre campaign that also included downhole surveying, geomechanical sampling and hydrogeological testing.

Four days earlier Commerce announced a new infrastructure model that could cut costs by locating its hydrometallurgical operation in southern Quebec or the Maritime region.

In late April the company reported successful Phase I tests at its flotation mini-pilot plant in Colorado, which achieved both its goals by producing several kilograms of mixed rare earths concentrate and demonstrating flotation performance on a continuous basis.

The previous month Commerce filed an updated 43-101 technical report for its Blue River tantalum-niobium project in southeastern British Columbia, which reached the preliminary economic assessment stage in 2011.

Read more about Commerce Resources.

Read about rare earths in Canada.

Disclaimer: Commerce Resources Corp is a client of OnPage Media Corp, the publisher of ResourceClips.com. The principals of OnPage Media may hold shares in Commerce Resources.

Lakeland Resources expands its southwestern Athabasca Basin uranium presence

May 29th, 2015

by Greg Klein | May 29, 2015

Lakeland Resources expands its southwestern Athabasca Basin uranium presence

Carter Lake claims straddle the bountiful Patterson Lake
corridor as well as the under-explored Carter corridor.

 

New acquisitions announced May 28 nearly triple the size of Lakeland Resources’ (TSXV:LK) Carter Lake property in Saskatchewan’s southwestern Athabasca Basin. Contiguous claims picked up through purchase and staking now bring the project’s footprint to 10,052 hectares. The property straddles both the Carter Lake and Patterson Lake conductive corridors, the latter host to the Triple R deposit and R600W zone at Fission Uranium’s (TSX:FCU) Patterson Lake South, the Arrow and Bow zones at NexGen Energy’s (TSXV:NXE) Rook 1, and the Spitfire zone at Hook Lake, a joint venture of Purepoint Uranium TSXV:PTU, Cameco TSX:CCO and AREVA Resources Canada.

With 32 properties totalling over 300,000 hectares, Lakeland holds one of the Basin-region’s largest portfolios.

Carter Lake’s depths to the unconformity are estimated at 500 metres or more, similar to some of the depths of uranium mineralization found by NexGen at Arrow. Carter Lake also encompasses parts of the relatively unexplored Carter corridor, an area that’s had only five known historic drill holes, despite the positive exploration potential, Lakeland stated.

Subject to approvals, 5,095 hectares of the new turf comes from Eagle Plains Resources TSXV:EPL for $40,000 and 800,000 shares. Lakeland got another 1,260 new hectares by staking 38 claims. Those 38 claims, along with four claims of the original property, are subject to a 2% NSR payable to Eagle Plains, half of which Lakeland may buy for $1 million.

“The summer of 2015 will see active exploration at multiple, high-potential projects across the Athabasca Basin for Lakeland,” commented president/CEO Jonathan Armes. “In addition to work programs at Gibbon’s, Newnham Lake and Key Lake Road, we will prepare for reconnaissance scale work at Carter Lake, given the number of recent uranium discoveries along the Patterson Lake corridor.”

Gibbon’s Creek underwent Phase I drilling last winter, with positive results released in early May.

Read more about Lakeland Resources’ Star/Gibbon’s Creek project.

Disclaimer: Lakeland Resources Inc is a client of OnPage Media Corp, the publisher of ResourceClips.com. The principals of OnPage Media may hold shares in Lakeland Resources.

Canvest ’15

May 28th, 2015

Commodities, tech, trends converge at Vancouver’s Canadian Investor Conference

by Greg Klein

The event takes place in familiar surroundings at the Vancouver Convention Centre West from May 31 to June 1. But while Canvest ’15 has become an annual institution, it’s one that adapts to the times. That gives mining and exploration investors a chance to not only catch up with companies’ progress but learn more about the convergence of commodities with energy and technology. Nearly 40 speakers will present talks, panel discussions, corporate presentations and workshops, along with almost 100 exhibitors ready to meet investors one-on-one.

Commodities, technologies, trends converge at Vancouver’s Canadian Investor Conference

Shown here at last year’s Canvest, Chris Berry emphasizes
the importance of learning about energy minerals
and their supply chains.

Considering the challenges of resource markets, Chris Berry credits Canvest organizer Cambridge House International for this new approach. “I think a lot of stakeholders in the natural resource space are searching for the new model,” says the Disruptive Discoveries Journal co-editor. “My sense is that Cambridge House may be on to something by trying to broaden its scope and provide opportunities for investors to get some insights into how natural resources and technology are converging.”

With such a broad range, not every sector links up with each other. But topics include mineral exploration, oil and gas, liquefied natural gas, agriculture, life sciences, energy metals, technology and—appropriately for a city where weed wafts ubiquitously—marijuana.

Canvest’s opening day promises to keep Berry busy with a keynote talk and four panel discussions. “My presentation will focus on disruptive technologies, not so much in the mining space but in the economy, taking a macro view of some of the forces I think are converging right now that make learning about disruptive business models and the potential for metals demand very, very important,” he says.

Even with minerals markets facing a prolonged downturn, Berry sees signs of hope. “I think the really optimistic and bullish case has to do with how quickly energy technologies, and technology in general, are being adopted and advanced. Longer-term, you want to be looking at a country like India. It’s much less urbanized than China, which served as the engine for metal demand.”

Among Berry’s Sunday panels will be an 11:30 a.m. commodities forum with reps from four holdings of prospect generator Zimtu Capital TSXV:ZC. On board will be Commerce Resources TSXV:CCE (rare earths, tantalum, niobium), Equitas Resources TSXV:EQT (nickel), Electra Stone TSXV:ELT (jade, industrial minerals) and Lakeland Resources TSXV:LK (uranium).

Cambridge House describes its speaker line-up as “top industry analysts, newsletter writers, c-suite executives, hedge fund managers, trends forecasters and finance celebrities.” Twenty “young” clean tech companies will take their places at the new PowerHaus Pavilion. Events that aren’t formally on the agenda but remain well-entrenched Canvest customs include networking, schmoozing, gossiping and maybe just a bit of rumour-mongering.

Commodities, technologies, trends converge at Vancouver’s Canadian Investor Conference

Gianni Kovacevic says Canvest offers exposure to bold
new technologies as well as essential commodities.

Sunday’s 8:30 a.m. opening features a keynote presentation by Gianni Kovacevic, chairperson of CopperBank Resources CSE:CBK and author of My Electrician Drives a Porsche? His talk covers emerging markets, their “new spending class,” the merger of technology and energy, and other aspects of “the new energy renaissance.” He’ll also discuss his book, in which Kovacevic expresses his ideas through the interplay of two fictional characters, a boomer-generation doctor and a younger tradesman who became a canny investor by studying new and emerging trends.

Kovacevic will be giving away free copies of the novel.

He sees positive signs for the minerals sector through the simple necessity of supply. “Nobody’s building anything new of significance—I mean big, big new mines,” he says. “Ultimately you need a stronger underlying commodity price or nothing’s going to get built, so it’s a matter of time.”

A veteran of previous Cambridge House events as well as other investor shows, Kovacevic expects to see a lot of new faces among Canvest’s new diversified exhibitors. As for returning companies, he says they’ll offer investors a report card on their progress.

“The hard core resource investor talks to the 30 people he always talks to, he meets five or 10 new guys, he kicks the tires,” Kovacevic explains. “Even if you’re not going to invest right now, you’re going to see a company you like and you’re interested in, and if that sector moves or that company moves, you get very interested very quickly.”

Canvest ’15 runs May 31 to June 1, from 8:30 to 5:30, at Vancouver Convention Centre West. Avoid the $20 door charge by registering in advance.

Disclaimer: Zimtu Capital Corp, Commerce Resources Corp and Lakeland Resources Inc are clients of OnPage Media Corp, the publisher of ResourceClips.com. The principals of OnPage Media may hold shares in those companies.

May 28th, 2015

Home battery systems like Tesla’s are already popular in Germany Equities Canada
Yukon Premier Darrell Pasloski: Our goal is to be the number one mining location Streetwise Reports
Barrick teams with Zijin Mining at Porgera mine Stockhouse
Australian government rules out iron ore inquiry NAI 500
Strict specifications: UK frac sand potential Industrial Minerals
China’s silk road economic project will include gold GoldSeek
Great deposits of the world—Hishikari, Japan Geology for Investors

Seven big miners form global Diamond Producers Association

May 27th, 2015

by Greg Klein | May 27, 2015

There was a time when De Beers was, to a large extent, the world’s diamond mining association. That was back when De Beers was, to a large extent, the world’s diamond mining industry. Those days are gone and now the company, still a global heavyweight, has partnered with six others to create the Diamond Producers Association.

ALROSA, De Beers, Rio Tinto NYE:RIO, Dominion Diamond TSX:DDC, Lucara Diamond TSX:LUC, Petra Diamonds and Gem Diamonds “will work together to support the development of the diamond sector,” the septet announced May 27. The organization described its mandate as:

Seven big miners form global Diamond Producers Association

  • maintaining and enhancing consumer demand for and confidence in diamonds including joint category marketing initiatives

  • providing a reliable source of industry information, including trade and consumer research

  • acting as the unified voice of the diamond producers, when required and/or appropriate, with industry and non-industry forums/organizations

  • communicating the role and contribution of diamond producers to the diamond sector and broader society

  • sharing best practices in health and safety, licence to operate, supply chain integrity and environment management

Word on exactly how the DPA will carry out those endeavours and with what emphasis will likely wait until the organization begins operations under a still-to-be-hired executive director. The companies chipped in an annual budget of US$6 million.

Read about diamond supply and demand.

Read about diamond mining in Canada.

Gold—pricey or priceless?

May 27th, 2015

Ancient Colombian cultures put another perspective on the metal’s precious qualities

by Greg Klein

Gold’s allure, where it exists at all, can manifest itself in different ways. British Columbia natives, for example, remained indifferent to the metal until the arrival of prospectors. Those gold-hungry newcomers, on the other hand, were driven almost entirely by rapacity. But the pre-Conquest indigenous peoples of today’s Colombia saw nothing of value in the metal itself until, converted by metallurgy and craftsmanship, it became an object not only of beauty but of symbolic importance or transformational power.

That’s demonstrated by Allure of Gold, an exhibit within the exhibit called Gold Rush! El Dorado in British Columbia at Victoria’s Royal B.C. Museum. Holding 137 pieces of pre-Hispanic artefacts dating to 500 BC, the display makes its first North American appearance from Bogota’s Museo del Oro. Even now the pieces symbolize the Colombian peoples’ identity, pride and shared past, Museo director Maria Alicia Uribe Villegas told ResourceClips.com.

Ancient Colombian cultures put another perspective on the metal’s precious qualities

This gold pendant, in a style dating between 900 and 1600, would “transform” political or religious leaders into batmen, bestowing such
powers as the ability to fly, see at night and rest upside-down.
(Photo: Museo del Oro)

“These were objects that were produced mainly for display and to build power—political and religious power—by transmitting the properties of the materials,” she explained. People believed the objects asserted status, hosted spirits, or enhanced fertility and the overall quality of life.

According to belief, many objects wielded power to transform the person wearing it into another being. “They could for example acquire the identity of the jaguar, of birds, of bats,” Uribe said. “By wearing the ornament they believed they transformed their body, and by transforming their body they changed their perspective and their identity. So the power of many rulers came from that transformation. They believed that by transforming into a bird, you could fly to other worlds, to other dimensions, to the spiritual dimension, meet the spirits and the gods and ask for things, ask for hunting prey or for rain or things that your group needed.”

Some objects also presented a view of cosmology, she pointed out. “In most of these societies there isn’t this difference between nature and culture. Animals and people were nature and culture at the same time. Animals are also humans, different kinds of humans than people, so the relations between animals and humans were understood as social relations…. When you hunt you have to seduce the prey and you have to give the spiritual owner of the animal a gift in exchange.” Uribe said gold then functioned in “a transactional world,” but in a symbolic sense, not as currency.

Why was gold chosen for such representations? “It’s interesting because it’s a cultural choice,” she replied, noting that B.C. aboriginals knew about gold but didn’t use it. “It’s a wonderful material,” she added. “It’s beautiful for its colour and the shine you can give it, it doesn’t corrode, it lasts forever, and also you can give it the shape you want by hammering it or casting it.”

Although natives north of Mexico didn’t practise metallurgy, those of Colombia produced gold-copper and gold-silver alloys. When silver was used it was normally in the country’s south, which had cultural connections with today’s Peru and Ecuador. Colombians used platinum too. They couldn’t melt it because of the metal’s exceptional resistance to heat but South Americans were “the only people in the ancient world that used platinum.”

Ancient Colombian cultures put another perspective on the metal’s precious qualities

In a style dating between 1 BC and 700 AD, this breastplate would “transform” a chieftain or priest into a jaguar, allowing him to communicate with jaguar spirits and granting him deep respect and obedience. (Photo: Museo del Oro)

Almost all that effort was motivated by symbolism and spirituality, not practicality. But Colombians did make some metal tools for fashioning other metal objects, for example to hammer gold, Uribe noted. They also fashioned metal into needles and fishing hooks. But “those were the only practical tools they made.” Otherwise precious metals were used “for these objects of meaning.”

It’s a wonder that any of it survived the efficiently bloodthirsty business of confiscating the artwork and turning it into bullion. As Matthew Hart wrote about Francisco Pizarro’s 16th century conquest of Peru, “The artistic output of a thousand years vanished into the furnaces. It must be one of the most potent images in history—the transformation of a culture into cash.”

Most of what survived were funerary offerings hidden in tombs. “But the Spanish learned how to identify these tombs and many of them were looted,” Uribe said. Incredibly, ancient artefacts were still being melted as late as the 19th and even 20th century.

Where’s that gold now? You might be wearing some of it. The global gold supply comes from diverse and sometimes ancient sources, one of the museum displays points out. The bling in your ring could come from a Colombian chief or an Egyptian pharaoh.

But some of Colombia’s treasures were preserved by local collectors and European museums. The Museo del Oro’s collection started in 1939, after Colombia’s minister of education prevailed on the country’s national bank, then holding a monopoly on gold ownership, “to keep these objects out of the market, being taken abroad and melted,” Uribe said.

Now all such artefacts belong to the country’s entire population, she explained. A private collector must register with the office of archeological heritage and may ask for tenancy on a privately held collection. But Colombia retains ownership. “You cannot buy it, sell it or even inherit it.”

So while the commodity’s spot price keeps gold bugs guessing, these objects remain priceless.

Allure of Gold appears with Gold Rush! El Dorado in British Columbia at Victoria’s Royal B.C. Museum until October 31.

Read more about the Colombian national collection.

Read more about Gold Rush! El Dorado in British Columbia.

May 27th, 2015

Home battery systems like Tesla’s are already popular in Germany Equities Canada
Yukon Premier Darrell Pasloski: Our goal is to be the number one mining location Streetwise Reports
Barrick teams with Zijin Mining at Porgera mine Stockhouse
Australian government rules out iron ore inquiry NAI 500
Strict specifications: UK frac sand potential Industrial Minerals
China’s silk road economic project will include gold GoldSeek
Great deposits of the world—Hishikari, Japan Geology for Investors

MGX Minerals teams with Eaton Industries and Highbury Energy on Driftwood Creek magnesium project

May 26th, 2015

by Greg Klein | May 26, 2015

A partnership agreement announced May 26 brings MGX Minerals CSE:XMG considerable support to develop its flagship Driftwood Creek magnesium property in southern British Columbia. Immediate plans include a scoping study with initial results expected in about 30 days. The study will consider a processing plant with one or more industrial kilns and ancillary processing equipment for calcining magnesite ore. Caustic calcined magnesia can be used in fertilizer and feedstock, hydrometallurgy for nickel, copper and cobalt, pulp and paper production, and water treatment.

MGX Minerals teams with Eaton Industries and Highbury Energy on Driftwood Creek magnesium project

Recent surface sampling followed
last year’s drill program at Driftwood.

The study will be conducted by Eaton Industries (Canada), a subsidiary of Eaton Corp NYE:ETN, which provides energy-efficient services for electrical, hydraulic and mechanical power, including new mine and mill design. With about 102,000 employees, Eaton Corp’s 2014 revenue came to US$22.6 billion.

The third partner is Highbury Energy, a company that uses proprietary technology to convert biomass into high-grade synthesis or fuel gas. Driftwood’s kiln would be powered partly by Highbury’s technology, offering the project clean, low-cost energy.

The three companies will work together on several aspects of designing, developing and financing Driftwood’s proposed mining and processing project. Additionally, the trio will apply a similar business model to between seven and 10 other industrial minerals projects, MGX stated. The company’s portfolio includes most of B.C.’s known magnesite occurrences.

MGX also holds a strategic alliance with Zimtu Capital TSXV:ZC and Electra Stone TSXV:ELT to develop other B.C. industrial minerals properties, including Electra’s Longworth silica project. Additionally MGX has a technical services agreement regarding Electra’s chalky geyserite (aluminum silica) quarry operation on Vancouver Island.

Read more about MGX Minerals.

Disclaimer: Zimtu Capital Corp is a client of OnPage Media Corp, the publisher of ResourceClips.com. The principals of OnPage Media may hold shares in Zimtu Capital.

May 26th, 2015

Yukon Premier Darrell Pasloski: Our goal is to be the number one mining location Streetwise Reports
Barrick teams with Zijin Mining at Porgera mine Stockhouse
Australian government rules out iron ore inquiry NAI 500
Strict specifications: UK frac sand potential Industrial Minerals
China’s silk road economic project will include gold GoldSeek
Plenty of competitors for Tesla in home energy storage market Equities Canada
Great deposits of the world—Hishikari, Japan Geology for Investors

An “extreme prospector” describes his motivation to author Steve Boggan

May 25th, 2015

…Read more