Tuesday 12th December 2017

Resource Clips


January, 2015

Aboriginal engagement

January 30th, 2015

AME BC’s Gathering Place sees progress among the problems, hope for the future

by Greg Klein

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Over 6,700 participants from 35 countries descended on Vancouver to give Roundup 2015 the fourth-largest crowd in its 32-year history. Promotion, deals and networking thrived, but so did the Association for Mineral Exploration British Columbia’s education and outreach programs. Prominent among them was Gathering Place, a four-day dialogue in which miners, natives and others tackled tough issues as the industry undergoes a cultural transformation.

AME BC’s Gathering Place sees progress among the problems, hope for the future

Tsimshian, Coast Salish, Tlingit and Kwakwaka’wakw
dancers take part in a Roundup cultural performance.

Generalities and platitudes flowed freely. But discussion could be candid too. Some company reps outlined specific policies to bring aboriginals into mining and exploration while natives suggested further courses of action. While acknowledging the seemingly slow pace of progress, one CEO maintained, “If you look back 25 years ago and look where we are today, I think you’d probably describe it as a revolution.”

Among the success stories would appear to be Kaminak Gold’s (TSXV:KAM) Coffee project. Now moving towards feasibility, Kaminak reached out to local communities in 2010, soon after optioning the Yukon property and prior to staking additional claims.

“We wanted to know if there were trap lines in the area, we wanted to know if there were any cultural or sensitive areas, or any historical areas that we need to be aware of,” explained Allison Rippin Armstrong, Kaminak’s VP of lands and environment.

Natives alerted the company about nearby gravesites, which Kaminak then excluded from staking. “That early engagement helped us avoid what potentially could have been a very distressing situation,” Armstrong said. The company funded a heritage resource study for reference when planning exploration. Environmental monitoring also began in 2010 with the help—and input—of employees from the Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in first nation (TH). The natives, who’d already signed a land claim agreement, have traditional territory covering Kaminak’s deposit.

The project currently has three TH environmental monitors working with consultants who collect data at the site. The monitors also help “develop and define the baseline programs so they come from a first nation community perspective as opposed to just a purely scientific perspective,” Armstrong emphasized.

As Kaminak president/CEO Eira Thomas told a panel discussion, the company solicits native concerns during its environmental work. By the time Kaminak files a permit application, she hopes those concerns will be addressed.

In another forward-looking precaution, Kaminak provides pre-season work plans to first nations for input and review. An exploration and co-operation agreement signed with TH in 2013 includes a conflict resolution process.

Kaminak has also developed a program of modular training, involving flexible courses that can be scheduled around work and other commitments. The courses don’t require a high school diploma yet could lead to university studies, Armstrong said.

A partnership with Yukon College will bring about two pilot courses this year to prepare TH citizens for skilled jobs. “If and when our mine gets built, the entire environmental department will be TH citizens.”

Fewer specifics came from a panel discussion involving the heads of four companies with mines or advanced-stage projects.

New Gold TSX:NGD president/CEO Robert Gallagher did point out that certain contracts at the company’s New Afton mine in central B.C. are restricted to first nations businesses. Natives make up 23% of the mine’s employees. A plan to team up aspiring aboriginal businesses with experienced joint venture partners, however, failed to transmit skills from one company to the other.

Then New Gold brought in a business development director. “He works with the first nations to develop the skills and put training in place so they can really learn the business,” Gallagher said. As it stands now, the new business still works with a JV partner. But New Gold plans to eventually split the contract between two former partners as the JV ends and a standalone native-owned company emerges.

An aboriginal business owner in the audience urged companies to train natives to adapt to camp life. “If you don’t train them the right way, you’re just wasting money because it’s a Jerry Springer show every night after supper in the rec room.”

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January 30th, 2015

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Gemstone exploration and deposits in Canada? Geology for Investors
Coal production drops in China for first time in 14 years as country switches to cleaner energy Stockhouse
Cambridge House TV interviews Dundee Capital Markets chief economist Martin Murenbeeld GoldSeek
Gold, silver, platinum and copper outlook Equities Canada
Cambridge House conference in Vancouver—cautiously optimistic in the midst of first acquisition of the year NAI 500
Chris Berry identifies commodity companies with the disruptive advantage Streetwise Reports

January 29th, 2015

Olivine: The green solution to climate change? Geology for Investors
Coal production drops in China for first time in 14 years as country switches to cleaner energy Stockhouse
Mining Indaba: Putting capital to work in Africa Industrial Minerals
Cambridge House TV interviews Dundee Capital Markets chief economist Martin Murenbeeld GoldSeek
Gold, silver, platinum and copper outlook Equities Canada
Cambridge House conference in Vancouver—cautiously optimistic in the midst of first acquisition of the year NAI 500
Chris Berry identifies commodity companies with the disruptive advantage Streetwise Reports

January 28th, 2015

Olivine: The green solution to climate change? Geology for Investors
Coal production drops in China for first time in 14 years as country switches to cleaner energy Stockhouse
Mining Indaba: Putting capital to work in Africa Industrial Minerals
Cambridge House TV interviews Dundee Capital Markets chief economist Martin Murenbeeld GoldSeek
Gold, silver, platinum and copper outlook Equities Canada
Cambridge House conference in Vancouver—cautiously optimistic in the midst of first acquisition of the year NAI 500
Chris Berry identifies commodity companies with the disruptive advantage Streetwise Reports

Drilling now underway at Lakeland Resources’ Star/Gibbons Creek uranium project

January 27th, 2015

by Greg Klein | January 27, 2015

A minimum 1,500-metre drill program has begun at Lakeland Resources’ (TSXV:LK) Star/Gibbon’s Creek uranium project on the Athabasca Basin’s north-central edge. Announced January 27, the campaign follows recent and historic exploration that found anomalous uranium, nickel, gold, platinum group elements and rare earths.

Drilling now underway at Lakeland Resources’ Star/Gibbons Creek uranium project

A sampling program helped define drill targets for Lakeland Resources’ Phase I campaign at Star/Gibbon’s Creek.

“The augmentation of historic exploration data with recent exploration results for these properties, coupled with a modern understanding of uranium mineralization in the Basin, has greatly enhanced the potential of this Phase I drill program,” said Lakeland president/CEO Jonathan Armes. “The company is well funded to carry out exploration on a number of its wholly owned Basin properties, and we expect a very busy and exciting year.” Last year’s financings raised over $5.1 million.

Star and Gibbon’s Creek are two adjacent properties explored as a single project. The 12,771-hectare Gibbon’s features some of the Basin’s highest RadonEx readings and a radioactive boulder field grading up to 4.28% U3O8. Surface samples from the Star property have revealed gold up to 5.7 grams per tonne, PGEs up to 0.75 g/t, rare earth elements up to 6.9% TREO, as well as highly anomalous uranium. All of that suggests a robust hydrothermal system, Lakeland stated.

The Star sampling program focused on part of a basement outcrop covering about 350 metres by 700 metres. Linking it to the boulder field is a structural corridor that’s been reactivated by hydrothermal fluids many times over the millennia.

The project also benefits from shallow depths to the unconformity, nearby roads and power lines, and the town of Stony Rapids a few kilometres away.

Holding one of the Basin’s largest land packages, the company has two other drill-ready projects, Lazy Edward Bay on the Basin’s southern rim and Newnham Lake, east of Star/Gibbon’s.

In December Lakeland announced a 50% option on its Fond du Lac uranium property by Takara Resources TSXV:TKK.

Read more about Lakeland Resources’ Star/Gibbon’s Creek project.

Disclaimer: Lakeland Resources Inc is a client of OnPage Media Corp, the publisher of ResourceClips.com. The principals of OnPage Media may hold shares in Lakeland Resources.

January 27th, 2015

Olivine: The green solution to climate change? Geology for Investors
Coal production drops in China for first time in 14 years as country switches to cleaner energy Stockhouse
Mining Indaba: Putting capital to work in Africa Industrial Minerals
Cambridge House TV interviews Dundee Capital Markets chief economist Martin Murenbeeld GoldSeek
Gold, silver, platinum and copper outlook Equities Canada
Cambridge House conference in Vancouver—cautiously optimistic in the midst of first acquisition of the year NAI 500
Chris Berry identifies commodity companies with the disruptive advantage Streetwise Reports

Yellowknife’s Giant mine bomber gets extended leave

January 26th, 2015

by Greg Klein | January 26, 2015

Sentenced to life imprisonment for killing nine strikebreakers in 1992, Roger Warren has been granted extended medical leave, Canadian Press reported January 26. Now 71, he had been on day parole since June after being released from a minimum security prison near Vancouver.

Yellowknife’s Giant mine bomber gets extended leave

In 1993 Warren, after agreeing to an RCMP lie detector test, admitted planting a bomb that killed the men during an acrimonious strike at Yellowknife’s Giant mine. He stated that he climbed down an unguarded shaft and connected explosives to a trip wire. A passing man car carrying nine workers detonated the bomb. Warren later tried to recant his confession but was convicted in 1995 of nine counts of second-degree murder. The judge called his actions “nothing less than an act of terrorism.”

Employees had walked off the job after the owner, Royal Oak Mines, called for cutbacks in wages and benefits due to a declining gold price. The bitterly divided town of 17,000 then experienced vandalism, arson, brawls and a near-riot following the company’s decision to bring in replacement workers and a private security force.

The union told media it was willing to tie wages to gold prices but wanted improvements in safety. “We just don’t want to see [Westray] happen here,” one striker told reporters, referring to the Nova Scotia mine accident that killed 26 underground workers in May 1992. Warren’s bomb went off three months later.

On behalf of the victims’ families, the Workers’ Compensation Board launched a $10-million lawsuit against Royal Oak, the security company, the union and the Northwest Territories government. In 2010, after 16 years of litigation, the federal Supreme Court dismissed the action.

The mine shut down in 1999 after Royal Oak went into receivership. The company left Canadian taxpayers with an estimated $903-million bill for a yet-to-begin plan to clean up 237,000 tonnes of arsenic trioxide.

“Giant was built before northern miners were required to post environmental cleanup bonds,” stated CP in March 2013. “In fact, the mess left at Giant is one of the reasons such legislation was drafted.”

Peregrine Diamonds’ inferred Chidliak resource grows 15%

January 26th, 2015

by Greg Klein | January 26, 2015

Peregrine Diamonds’ inferred Chidliak resource grows 15%

A Peregrine worker fuels tents in preparation
for Chidliak’s winter program.

Reporting from its Chidliak project on Nunavut’s Baffin Island, Peregrine Diamonds TSX:PGD announced a nearly 15% increase to the inferred resource that debuted in May. The January 26 update brings the CH-6 kimberlite’s inferred numbers to 3.32 million tonnes averaging 2.58 carats per tonne for 8.57 million carats. The update uses the same grade as the maiden resource. “All of the resource expansion at CH-6 was near surface, above 120 metres’ depth,” stated company president Brooke Clements. The kimberlite “has a surface expression of approximately one hectare and is open at depth,” Peregrine added.

An evaluation early last year of a 1,013.5-carat parcel of commercial-size rough diamonds from CH-6 brought an average $213 per carat. Various sources place the global average between about $100 and $120 per carat.

Peregrine also offered tonnage estimates that are “classified as targets for further exploration and are conceptual in nature.” In addition to the 43-101 resource, the CH-6 tonnage estimate now ranges between 3.2 and 4.38 million tonnes.

Additionally the CH-7 kimberlite, about 15 kilometres southeast of CH-6, gets an estimated 3.72 to 6.01 million tonnes, a 35% to 51% increase over last May’s numbers. About 17 kilometres southeast of CH-6, CH-44 gets an estimated 1.27 to 3.19 million tonnes, a 10% to 56% increase. “It is uncertain if further exploration will result in the tonnage estimates being delineated as a mineral resource,” Peregrine noted.

With large-diameter reverse circulation drilling expected to begin in early March, the three kimberlites will undergo about 1,000 tonnes of total sampling to determine grade and price estimates. Chidliak has a preliminary economic assessment slated for next year.

The company also holds a 72% stake in the WO project in the Northwest Territories’ Lac de Gras region. A 2008 indicated resource for the DO-27 kimberlite showed 19.5 million tonnes averaging 0.94 c/t for 18.2 million carats.

Read about diamond supply and demand.

Bain & Company and the Antwerp World Diamond Centre see diamond demand outpacing supply for the next 10 years

January 26th, 2015

…Read more

January 26th, 2015

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Cambridge House conference in Vancouver—cautiously optimistic in the midst of first acquisition of the year NAI 500
Open source data and the future of mineral exploration Geology for Investors
Chris Berry identifies commodity companies with the disruptive advantage Streetwise Reports