Monday 26th September 2016

Resource Clips


Year in review

A mining and exploration retrospect for 2014

by Greg Klein

Next Page 1 | 2

Another difficult year notwithstanding, the resource sector failed to meet its apocalyptic doom. With a mixed bag of good, bad and quirky news, ResourceClips.com looks at some of the stories that helped characterize 2014.

Mount Polley to the breach

Even British Columbia’s environment minister called it a disaster. The August tailings dam collapse at Imperial Metals’ (TSX:III) Mount Polley copper-gold mine presented Canada’s mining industry with its own Exxon Valdez as a river of effluent, later estimated by the company at 24.4 million cubic metres, poured into the once-pristine Quesnel Lake watershed.

The dam’s original engineer was quick to disassociate itself. The current engineer and Imperial each implied the other might be at fault. There were suggestions that the company and the province should have known something was wrong as far back as 2010.

A mining and exploration retrospect for 2014

B.C. appointed a panel of engineers to investigate. B.C.’s Inspector of Mines began a separate investigation. And B.C.’s Information and Privacy Commissioner launched its own investigation—into the government.

B.C. also ordered third-party inspections of 98 tailings facilities at current and former mines. The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission requested companies report on their uranium tailings facilities.

Alaskans, meanwhile, questioned whether B.C. had the wherewithal to prevent downstream pollution from potential mines in the province’s northwest. A Vancouver Sun study found that the BC Liberal government cut mine inspections by more than half since coming to power in 2001.

Imperial has so far committed $67.4 million towards the disaster. In late December the company announced the sale of a 93-kilometre transmission line extension to the government-owned BC Hydro for $52 million.

B.C.’s performance as a mining jurisdiction

Mount Polley’s shutdown brings to mind the governing BC Liberals’ frequent reminder that more mines closed than opened when the NDP held power. So how’s the province doing under the current regime? According to a list provided by the Ministry of Mines and Energy, seven mines opened since 2001, when the BC Liberals gained power, while five shut down. One mine closed and re-opened. Another seven mines opened and closed. At least one omission in the last category, however, was Treasure Mountain which opened, closed, re-opened and re-closed.

Of course metal and coal prices play a crucial role. But during that period permitting problems plagued other potential operations, like Taseko Mines’ (TSX:TKO) New Prosperity gold-copper project and Pacific Booker Minerals’ (TSXV:BKM) Morrison copper-gold-molybdenum project. Both were refused environmental permits, arguably on non-environmental grounds—New Prosperity by the feds and Morrison by the province.

On a more positive note, Imperial has its Red Chris copper-gold mine now in development. (Please get it right this time.) Seabridge Gold TSX:SEA won provincial environmental approval in July and federal approval in December for Kerr-Sulphurets-Mitchell (KSM), which the company says hosts “one of the largest undeveloped gold and copper reserves in the world.”

An engineering marvel puts Cigar Lake in operation

Evidently the mining industry calls for optimism and perseverance in abundance. That, along with innovation, is what it took for Cameco Corp TSX:CCO to finally bring its Cigar Lake uranium project into production in March. Encouraging the heroic endeavour is an ore grade 100 times the world average, suggesting that high grade is the mother of invention.

The Saskatchewan mine’s 33-year saga began with a 1981 discovery, then continued with a number of setbacks that stalled construction. Even after the mine’s widely celebrated opening, Cigar Lake shut down from mid-July to early September for remedial freezing. Majority-owner Cameco injects and freezes a brine solution around the rock body to prevent flooding through the Athabasca sandstone. Water jet boring then pummels the ore into a slurry.

But the company’s determination seems at odds with uranium’s price. When a Scotiabank analyst asked why Cameco was bringing new uranium into an oversupplied market, president/CEO Tim Gitzel replied, “We need the pounds. We’ve got sales commitments for those pounds.”

The uranium price tease

A mining and exploration retrospect for 2014

Chart: Ux Consulting

Among the most vociferous prophets of a new uranium order, Paladin Energy TSX:PDN managing director/CEO John Borshoff keeps revising his gotta-happen-soon predictions of rising prices. He’s not the only one, so Borshoff was probably more frustrated than embarrassed when uranium once again proved him wrong.

The recalcitrant commodity seemed to perk up in early August, with a spot price indicator that rose 25% by late October. A nearly 90-degree ascent to $44 by mid-November seemed to justify Borshoff’s outlook. Alas, fickle uranium let down its believers, along with its price.

Borshoff’s boosterism, however, is backed up by others including Cameco’s Gitzel and David Talbot of Dundee Capital Markets, who in November stated, “We have always said, just like in 2006-2007, when [longer-term] contracting begins and the price moves, it will move fast.”

Next Page 1 | 2

Pages: 1 2


Comments are closed.

Share | rss feed

View All: Feature Articles