Thursday 23rd October 2014

Resource Clips


Week in review

A mining and exploration retrospect for December 1 to 7, 2012

by Greg Klein

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Lawyer wants to cross-examine Bre-X wives

A lawyer representing Alberta investors wants to know what happened to $95 million that two families received from the Bre-X fraud. The multi-billion-dollar mining scam hit the fan in 1997 and the company filed for bankruptcy in 2002. On Tuesday class-action lawyer Clint Docken told media he wants to cross-examine Ingrid Felderhof, ex-wife of Bre-X chief geologist John Felderhof, and Jeannette Walsh, widow of founder David Walsh, about affidavits the women made concerning their financial situation.

According to Tuesday’s Calgary Sun, Docken told court that the company founder received $25 million from investors while the chief geologist got $70 million. Ingrid Felderhof lives in the Cayman Islands. Jeannette Walsh lives in the Bahamas.

A mining and exploration retrospect

Docken told the Calgary Herald he also wants an appraisal of a Cayman Islands mansion the Felderhofs bought 15 years ago for $3 million.

“It’s important to know what it’s worth now,” the Herald quoted him. “That’s an asset that should be taken into consideration. If this claim is successful, she may have to sell it.”

Lawyers representing bankruptcy trustees Deloitte & Touche want the suit dismissed, saying there’s no money left. The Calgary Court of Queen’s Bench adjourned the case to May 30. The Herald also stated that Ontario has a parallel class-action suit underway.

Darryl Stretch’s downfall

Solid Gold Resources TSXV:SLD announced on Monday that it replaced outspoken CEO Darryl Stretch. According to a company statement, the BOD appointed director/chief financial officer Alan Myers interim CEO.

Stretch courted controversy several times after coming into conflict with the Wahgoshig native band and the Ontario government. He said the Wahgoshig wanted him to fund a $100,000 archeological study prior to drilling claims near Lake Abitibi in northeastern Ontario. Saying the company couldn’t afford it, he told the Globe and Mail last March, “It’s not my obligation to go find arrowheads for those people, period…. If they don’t like you, you don’t work.” That outburst followed a January court injunction ordering him to suspend drilling and consult with the Wahgoshig band. The company filed for leave to appeal, arguing that consultation wasn’t a legal obligation.

The Wahgoshig, in turn, filed a claim in February against the province and Solid Gold. According to a company statement, “the claim states that ‘the mining act does not establish any requirement on the Crown or the holder of a prospectors licence to consult or accommodate aboriginal communities’ therefore the act ‘is unconstitutional and of no force and effect.’”

According to an August Solid Gold statement, “While the company was restricted from operating in the area, the [Wahgoshig First Nation] used information obtained from Solid Gold during the consultation process to stake mineral claims over an area approximately six kilometres long and 500 metres wide, bordering the Solid Gold property.”

By September, a judge granted Solid Gold leave to appeal the court-imposed drilling suspension. The judge, according to a company statement, wrote that he saw “no basis in the facts of this case for an imposition of a duty to consult on Solid Gold. If the Crown wishes to delegate operational aspects of its duty it must establish a legislative or regulatory scheme. The mining act does not presently contain such a scheme.”

Such a scheme was already underway. Under new rules to take full effect April 1, the province will require companies to consult native bands prior to early-stage exploration drilling on Crown land. The bands will have 30 days to express concerns, which could then block a permit.

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