Monday 11th December 2017

Resource Clips


October, 2012

October 31st, 2012

A 300% increase in lithium-ion battery capacity by VantageWire
Gold stocks are catching up to bullion by the Financial Post
A Sprott portfolio manager shares his top picks by Equedia
The U.S. elections, dollar, stocks and gold by GoldSeek
The sky’s the limit in Saskatchewan by the Gold Report
Grandich update: U.S. market/bonds/dollar; gold and silver; oil and natural gas by the Grandich Report

New stock on the block

October 30th, 2012

Mason Graphite’s grade even surpasses Lac Knife

by Greg Klein

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Graphite’s back in the news with two major announcements, one of which shows a new contender fast approaching Canada’s vanguard of advanced projects. On October 30, the day after Focus Graphite TSXV:FMS released its much-anticipated PEA, Mason Graphite TSXV:LLG hit the world stage—or at least the TSX Venture exchange.

The result of a reverse takeover with a capital pool company, POCML 1 Inc, Mason’s trading debut opened October 30 at $0.90 and dropped to $0.68 before closing at $0.75. The newcomer’s Lac Guéret project in northern Quebec overtakes Focus flagship Lac Knife’s claim to have the highest-known graphite grade.

Mason Graphite’s grade even surpasses Lac Knife

Mason Graphite didn’t begin TSXV trading until October 30
but plans to fast-track its Lac Guéret Project towards production.

The 11,630-hectare Lac Guéret has measured and indicated resources of 7.6 million tonnes grading 20.4% carbon and an inferred resource of 2.76 million tonnes grading 17.29%. CEO Benoit Gascon tells ResourceClips, “I visited many graphite mines that operated or still operate during my 20 years. This one is unique for that level of grade.”

Gascon was president of Stratmin Graphite, former owner of Quebec’s Lac-des-Îles Mine, the largest of Canada’s two producing graphite mines. In 2002 Gascon negotiated Stratmin’s takeover to form Timcal Graphite & Carbon, which now operates the mine. Gascon stayed with Timcal in senior roles.

Mason picked up Lac Guéret earlier this year from Cliffs Natural Resources, which got the property as part of its 2011 acquisition of Consolidated Thompson. The price tag for Mason totals $1.5 million in warrants and $15 million cash, which includes $2.5 million on completing feasibility and another $5 million on beginning commercial production.

Lac Guéret’s resource was calculated last summer, based on 2006 drilling. Any day now an 18,000-metre drill program will wrap up, with one resource update planned for December and another for Q1 2013. December’s also slated for a PEA. Looking further ahead, feasibility is scheduled for Q3 2014 and commercial production in Q4 2015.

As for community relations, the company hopes to have an impact benefit agreement finalized with the Pessamit Innu band by Q3 2013.

Lac Guéret is a flake graphite deposit, says Mason’s corporate development officer Simon Marcotte. Early indications show that “large- and medium-sized flake together is north of 60% [of the resource], but we’re hoping it’ll be more than that. We’ll have a better idea by year-end,” he says.

Marcotte doesn’t understate his optimism about the resource updates. The project will boast “not only the highest grade of graphite in the world but also the biggest deposit by far—no two ways about that—by a very significant margin.”

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October 30th, 2012

Don’t fear a normal gold correction by VantageWire
Can Italy build an economy on barter? by Equedia
The U.S. elections, dollar, stocks and gold by GoldSeek
The sky’s the limit in Saskatchewan by the Gold Report
Eurozone rot spreads to Germany while China mends by the Financial Post
Grandich update: U.S. market/bonds/dollar; gold and silver; oil and natural gas by the Grandich Report

October 29th, 2012

Can Italy build an economy on barter? by Equedia
The U.S. elections, dollar, stocks and gold by GoldSeek
The sky’s the limit in Saskatchewan by the Gold Report
Eurozone rot spreads to Germany while China mends by the Financial Post
Grandich update: U.S. market/bonds/dollar; gold and silver; oil and natural gas by the Grandich Report
All signs pointing to gold by VantageWire

Jon Hykawy, Head of Global Research, Clean Technologies and Materials Analyst for Byron Capital Markets, speaking at the Vancouver 2012 Fluorspar Pre-Conference Workshop

October 29th, 2012

…Read More

Week in review

October 26th, 2012

A mining and exploration retrospect for October 20 to 26, 2012

by Greg Klein
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B.C. avalanche kills mining contractor

A surveyor working for Seabridge Gold TSX:SEA lost his life in northwestern British Columbia on Tuesday. According to a company statement, “Two experienced surveyors were working on a slope near the camp located at Sulphurets Creek when the avalanche occurred. One was able to get to safety; the other was swept into a gully and did not survive. A trained emergency rescue team was at the site of the accident within minutes.”

A mountainous, isolated but busy mining and exploration region east of the Alaska Panhandle, B.C.’s Golden Triangle is subject to heavy snow. Media reports, however, said the avalanche came unusually early in the season.

The B.C. Coroners Service identified the victim as 50-year-old Pat Lawrence Desmarais of Telkwa, B.C.

Cautious optimism about South Africa

A somewhat reassuring tone accompanied news from South Africa this week. On Thursday Bloomberg reported that “gold producers represented by the Chamber of Mines signed an agreement with labour unions over changes to pay and job categories today. Members have ‘overwhelmingly’ accepted the offer which, when added to a [previous] two-year deal, will see wages increase by as much as 20.8%.” Media accounts imply that as gold miners return to work, other miners will follow.

A mining and exploration retrospect

Also on Thursday, Reuters said the strikes caused Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan to cut his 2012 GDP forecast from 2.7% to 2.5%. He emphasized more time is needed to determine the strikes’ full impact but “we will take that knock, recover from it and move on because life doesn’t end now or next week. Life moves on.”

On Friday Kitco.com provided another weekly summary of how major companies are faring in South Africa.

Dehua debacle drags on

Mandarin is no longer a requirement for Canadian miners who want to work for Canadian Dehua International’s Canadian projects. But it’s “definitely an asset.”

The company ignited controversy earlier this month over its plan to import thousands of Chinese to work in four proposed coal mines in northeastern B.C. The federal and provincial governments support the plan, partly because the company said recruitment efforts within Canada failed. The United Steelworkers union then revealed that the company, along with HD Mining International (40% held by Canadian Dehua and 55% by Huiyong Holdings), had made Mandarin-language skills essential for at least 70 positions advertised in Canada.

Now the company has downgraded that requirement to “definitely an asset.” On Wednesday the Vancouver Province reported eight such ads on the Mining Association of British Columbia’s Web site. By Friday four were still in place, for a civil engineer, electrical engineer, mechanical engineer and mining engineer.

A Wednesday Vancouver Sun story reported that Canada’s New Democratic Party (NDP) urged the federal government to suspend the Chinese miners’ work permits “until an investigation determines whether Canadians were given an adequate chance to show they can fill the jobs.”

The outrage is hardly limited to Canada. On Friday Taiwanese animators Next Media Animation presented their take in a video. With admirable consideration for Canadians, they even provided an English-language version.

Read more about Canadian Dehua’s personnel policy here and here.

Central banks move in mysterious ways

Gold resumed its unsteady rise above $1,700 after dropping to Wednesday’s $1,698.70, the lowest price since September 7, Bloomberg reported. “More and more central banks are getting involved in the gold market,” the news agency quoted David Meger of Vision Financial Markets in Chicago. In an article re-posted by MarketWatch on Saturday, 24/7 Wall St. compared central bank gold reserves with their corresponding countries’ GDP and other economic highlights. There were some surprises.

The Netherlands ranks 63rd in the world for population and 17th for GDP, but ninth for gold reserves (612.5 tonnes). Like some other European countries, the Netherlands hasn’t yet sold all the gold required under the Central Bank Gold Agreement, 24/7 Wall St. stated. “It may need that gold to protect itself if the euro comes unravelled.”

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October 26th, 2012

The U.S. elections, dollar, stocks and gold by GoldSeek
The sky’s the limit in Saskatchewan by the Gold Report
Eurozone rot spreads to Germany while China mends by the Financial Post
China, India gold buying down by Equedia
Grandich update: U.S. market/bonds/dollar; gold and silver; oil and natural gas by the Grandich Report
All signs pointing to gold by VantageWire

October 25th, 2012

A European approach to mining investment by the Gold Report
Western central banks have enormous secrets about gold by GoldSeek
Eurozone rot spreads to Germany while China mends by the Financial Post
China, India gold buying down by Equedia
Grandich update: U.S. market/bonds/dollar; gold and silver; oil and natural gas by the Grandich Report
All signs pointing to gold by VantageWire

October 24th, 2012

Is financial crime a systemic risk? by GoldSeek
Eurozone rot spreads to Germany while China mends by the Financial Post
China, India gold buying down by Equedia
Grandich update: U.S. market/bonds/dollar; gold and silver; oil and natural gas by the Grandich Report
Extraordinary stories of tungsten and fluorspar by the Gold Report
All signs pointing to gold by VantageWire

October 24th, 2012

Is financial crime a systemic risk? by GoldSeek
China, India gold buying down by Equedia
Grandich update: U.S. market/bonds/dollar; gold and silver; oil and natural gas by the Grandich Report
Forget gold: Here’s where die-hard skeptics stash their wealth by the Financial Post
Extraordinary stories of tungsten and fluorspar by the Gold Report
All signs pointing to gold by VantageWire